Print / Share

FacultyPages

Matyas Buzgo

Matyas Buzgo

Name: Matyas Buzgo

Title: Assistant Professor

Start Year at LSUS: 2007

Department: Biological Sciences Department

School: Mathematics and Sciences

College: Liberal Arts and Sciences

Office Location: Science Building 115A

Office Phone: 318-797-5120

Office Fax: 318-797-5222

Email: matyas.buzgo@lsus.edu

Office Hours: Starting with fall semester 2011:
Mon & Tues, 12:30-5:00; with reservation of sporadic lab preparation and service commitments as marked on the door of the office suite.

Teaching Assignments:

2011:
BIOS 224, T+R, 9:30-10:45
BIOS 224L, R, 14:00- 17:00
BIOS 110, Mon 9:00 am - 10:50 am Online, or as announced in Syllabus
BIOS 110L, TBD 

Research Interests:

General and Past:
My research interest is evolutionary biology of land plants,   especially flowering plants (angiosperms) and non-flowering   seed plants (gymnosperms).  I am particularly interested in   the evolution of development (EvoDevo) of the flower and   floral organs, and other reproductive organs. Where did   carpels and stamens come from? How did the ancestral   organs look and how were they arranged throughout the   plant, before we would recognize them as "flower"?  Do we   have fossil representations of these pre-angiosperms?  Apart  from the sporangia, what is the principal difference between   a vegetative leaf and a floral organ?  Is there any, at all?

Actual, and Student Research Opportunities:
Synopsis:

1) Leaf development and evolution in Eusporangiate ferns: Ophioglossaceae and Psilotaceae are odd siblings.
We re-examined the morphology of Psilotum. and found that the "green aerial frond" corresponds rather to fern aleaf than to a stem. With this, Psilotum indeed is "similar" to Ophioglossaceae in terms of organ identity of its parts. The differences that meks these taxa so oddly dissimilar are based on differences of their development: Heterochony and Homeotisis.

2) Fern embryology: tip-to-toe embryo
In the very early stage, also the embryo of regular ferns (model organism Ceratopteris) develops in a linear, bipolar manner. However, we have not yet identified hypostasis, root initiation in Ceratopteris, and we still have a long way to study the embryo of Pslotum or Ophioglossaceae.

3) Plant tissue culture: Louisiana Iris, day lily
The purpose is to establish a successful protocol for plant tissue cultures derived from shoot apex meristems or parenchyma cells of select organism, such as Iris and Hemerocallis.

Details:
1) Leaf development and evolution in Eusporangiate ferns
Previous Team: Annie Phanid Miller,  Sarah Witherington, Cassie Cole, Dr. Cran M Lucas; BSA 2010 242, 244.

"Ferns" in general (Monilophytes) are the closest relatives of extant seed plants, and many know them as an archaic group of plants, associated with dinosaurs, etc.  However, most ferns ("ferns" in the narrow sense) belong to a single group (or "clade") called Leptosporangiate Ferns, based on their very peculiar sporangium.  This group radiated relatively recently, and is not really "archaic", but actualy modern; sadly, most truely archaic groups have died out.  From all the "old style" ferns (eusporangiate ferns), only three groups have survived to today: Horsetails (Equisetaceae), Boat-ferns (Marrattiaceae), and the group of Ophioglossaceae and Psilotaceae.

This last group, Ophioglossaceae and Psilotaceae, is the biggest surprise of the last years' research.  Psilotaceae, seemingly without leaves and or roots, was long time considered not a fern, but actually older than all other vascular land plants, older even than club-mosses (Lycophytes).  Ophioglossaeae, however, with a peculiar stem growth, vascular system, and an elaborate axial, stem-like outgrowth bearing the sporanga, has been considered closer related to seed plants than normal ferns.  Yet, molecular analysis revealed these two "opposite" families as two monophyletic sisters, and within the monilophytes.  And: while a review of morphological data showed a great correspondance to molecular findings, it could not copy the molecular data for the Ophioglossaceae-Psilotaceae clade.

We re-examined the morphology of Psilotum. and found that the "green aerial frond" corresponds rather to fern aleaf than to a stem. With this, Psilotum indeed is "similar" to Ophioglossaceae in terms of organ identity of its parts. The differences that meks these taxa so oddly dissimilar are based on differences of their development: Heterochony and Homeosis.

2) Fern embryology: tip-to-toe embryo in c-fern
Previous Team: Christopher Young, Jonette Green, Lauren Woodward.

Psilotum realy has no root - what happened to it?  Is it initiated in the embryo?  Actually, how do ferns in general initiate roots?  

Seed plants have a strict bi-polarity in the pro-embryo: suspensor-embryo. The rood forms in below the suspensor from a defined cell layer (the "hypostatsis"), and grows clearly into the direction opposite to the shoot apex of the embryo. However, in fern embryos we knew, root and shoot apex emerge in one direction, opposite to the suspensor. That is, even the root development of regular ferns is not really understood.

The leptosporangiate fern Ceratopteris ("c-fern") is a model organism for fern genetics and development. We established a protocol for its gametophyte cultivation and were able to study the very early embryo development. We found, that in this very early stage, also the fern embryo develops in a linear, bipolar manner. However, we have not yet identified hypostasis, root initiation in Ceratopteris, and we still have a long way to study the embryo of Pslotum or Ophioglossaceae.

3) Plant tissue culture: Louisiana Iris, day lily
The project is in collaboration between LSUS (Biological Sciences) and Plantation Point Nursery (Mooringsport LA).  The organism are Louisiana iris and day lilies (Iris section Apogon and Hemerocallis). The primary intent is to transfer rhizomatous tissue (parenchyma and shoot apex meristems) to a solid growth gel containing cell dedifferentiating growth factors, resulting in a plant tissue callus. A second approach may use seeds as tissue start.

The bulk of storage and maintenance operation would be in Mooringsport and not burden LSUS facilities. It provides the opportunity to train students on a standard method used in agriculture, horticulture, and plant biology.  The outlook of this project is to apply the findings onto the fern research project mentioned above.

Selected Publications:

Haiying, L., Carlson, J.E., Leebens-Mack, J.H., Wall,P.K.,   Mueller, L.A., Buzgo, M., Landherr, L.L., Hu, Y., DiLoreto, D.S., Ilut, D.C., Field, D., Tanksley, S.D., Ma, H. dePamphilis,   C.W.  2007.  An EST Database for Liriodendron tulipiferaL. floral buds: the first EST resource for functional and comparative genomics in Liriodendron. Tree Genetics and Genomes 4(3): 419-433.

Soltis, D.E., Chanderbali, A.S., Kim, S., Buzgo, M., Soltis, P.S.  2007.  The ABC model and its applicability to basal angiosperms.  Annals of Botany 100: 155-163.

Buzgo, M., Chanderbali A.S., Kim, S., Zheng, Z., Oppenheimer, D., Soltis, P.S., Soltis, D.E.  2007.  Floral developmental morphology of Persea americana (avocado,   Lauraceae): the oddities of male organ identity. International Journal of Plant Sciences 168 (3): 261-284.

Buzgo, M., Soltis, D.E., Soltis, P.S., Kim, S., Ma, H., Hauser, B.A., Leebens-Mack, J., Johansen, B.  2006.  Perianth development in the basal monocot Triglochin maritima  (Juncaginaceae).  - In: Columbus, J.T., Friar, E.A., Porter,   J.M., Prince, L.M., Simpson, M.G. (eds), Monocots: Comparative Biology and Evolution, (excluding Poales).  Claremont, CA, USA: Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, pp. 107-125. (see also Aliso 22).

Soltis, P.S., Soltis, D.E., Kim, S., Chanderbali, A., Buzgo, M.  2006.  Expression of floral regulators I basal angiosperms and the origin and evolution of ABC function. - In: Soltis, D.E., Leebens-Mack, J.H., Soltis, P.S. (eds), Advances in Botanical Research, Vol. 44, Devlopmental Genetics of The Flower. Elsevier Ltd., London, UK (Academic Press, San Diego   CA, USA), pp. 483-506.

Albert, V.A., Soltis, D.E., Carlson, J.E., Farmerie, W.G., Wall,   P.K., Ilut, D.C., Solow, T.M., Mueller, L.A., Landherr, L.L., Hu, Y., Buzgo, M., Kim, S., Yoo, M.-J., Frohlich, M.W., Perl-   Treves, R., Schlarbaum, S., Bliss, B.J., Zhang, X., Tanksley,   S., Oppenheimer, D.G., Soltis, P.S., Ma, H., dePamphilis,   C.W., Leebens-Mack, J.H.  2005.  Floral gene resources from basal angiosperms for comparative genomics research. BMC Plant Biology 5 (1): 5.

Buzgo, M., Soltis, P.S., Kim, S., Soltis, D.E.  2005.  The making of a flower.  The Biologist 52: 149-154.

Buzgo, M., Soltis, P.S., Soltis, D.E.  2004.  Floral developmental morphology of Amborella trichopoda (Amborellaceae).  International Journal of Plant Sciences 165: 925-947.

Buzgo, M., Soltis, D.E., Soltis, P.S., Ma, H.  2004.  Towards a comprehensive integration of morphological and genetic studies of floral development.  Trends in Plant Science 9: 164-173.

Personal Bio:

Assistant Professor:  
Department of Biology, Louisiana State University in Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA 2007-present

Postdoctoral experience:  

  • Department of Botany, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA (with Drs. Douglas E. Soltis and Pamela S. Soltis)  2002-2007
  • Dept. of Evolutionary Botany, University Copenhagen, Denmark (with Dr. Bo Johansen) winter 2001
  • Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK (with Drs. Mark W. Chase and Paula J. Rudall)  2000-2001
  • Institute of Systematic Botany, University of Zurich  1999

Other:

  • System Engineer, IBM Switzerland Informatica,  1992-1994
  • Instructor and field guide, WWF Switzerland,  1989-1994
  • Laboratory technician, public relations officer and statistical analyst, Health Department of the City of Zurich, 1989-1992
  • Teaching Assistant, Research Assistant, University of Zurich,  1989-1992 and 1994-1999